Manufacturing External Threats to Ensure War Profits

06-09-2013 21:11
Manufacturing External Threats to Ensure War Profits - See more at: http://www.stateofnature.org/?p=5544#sthash.zeER66fl.dpuf

It is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a democracy, or a fascist dictatorship, or a parliament, or a communist dictatorship. Voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of their leaders. That is easy. All you have to tell them is that they are being attacked and denounce the peacemakers for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same in any country.
— Hermann Goering (Nuremberg Trials)

 

“External threats” and “national interests” have almost always been used as two blades of a metaphorical pair of scissors to cut through any opposition to war and militarism. In his well-known Imperialism and Social Classes, the late economic historian Joseph Schumpeter described the hoary pretext of “threatened national interests” for war and militarism in the following words:

There was no corner of the known world where some interest was not alleged to be in danger or under actual attack. If the interests were not Roman, they were those of Rome’s allies; and if Rome had no allies, then allies would be invented. When it was utterly impossible to contrive such an interest—why, then it was the national honor that had been insulted. The fight was always invested with an aura of legality. Rome was always being attacked by evil-minded neighbors, always fighting for a breathing-space. The whole world was pervaded by a host of enemies, and it was manifestly Rome’s duty to guard against their indubitably aggressive designs.

In a similar fashion, the U.S. military-industrial complex has proven quite resourceful in frequently inventing new “external threats to our national interests,” or “the interests of our allies,” in order to stifle opposition to its militaristic plans that are often designed to justify its colossal apparatus and its lion’s share of national resources. During the Cold War years, the “threat of communism” served this purpose. Since then new substitutes for the threat of communism have been discovered in order to rationalize continued expansion of military spending. These have included “rogue states, global terrorism, axis of evil, militant Islam” and, more recently, “enemies of democracy.” Scrutiny of the claims of such threats to the national security or interests of the United States is the focus of this study.

- See more at: http://www.stateofnature.org/?p=5544#sthash.zeER66fl.dpuf

De geschiedenis herhaalt zich (vooral) na de Tweede Wereldoorlog iedere keer weer. Eerst was het communisme het zogenaamde gevaar dat de Westerse Wereld bedreigde en nu dus het moslim-fundamentalisme. Het creeëren van een dreiging of vijandsbeeld heeft als belangrijke voordeel om allerlei geheime politieke agenda's (Trilateral Commission, CRF, Bilderbergconferenties, eenwording van Europa) kunnen doorvoeren, een manier om aan grondstoffen te komen, deze te beheersen en om het zogenaamde militair--industrieel complex iedere keer een nieuwe 'boost' te geven. Het opzetten van zogenaamde 'false flags' om als pretext een land aan te vallen is een beproefd middel om dit doel te bereiken. Of het land beschuldigen van het schenden van mensenrechten of het gebruik van chemische of biologische wapens*. Allemaal strategiëen om draagvlak te creeëren onder de bevolking.

Deze gang van zaken is in feite de basis geworden van onze westerse maatschappij (met in het bijzonder de Verenigde Staten) om onze economie te laten groeien. Lees hierover de analyse in onderstaand artikel van Ismael Hossein-zadeh, Emeritus Professor in de economie.

 

“Under capitalism, where production of military hardware is subject to market imperatives, actual wars are needed in order to generate “sufficient” demand for war-dependent industries and their profitability requirements.”

“Under capitalism, where production of military hardware is subject to market imperatives, actual wars are needed in order to generate “sufficient” demand for war-dependent industries and their profitability requirements.”

"It is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a democracy, or a fascist dictatorship, or a parliament, or a communist dictatorship. Voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of their leaders. That is easy. All you have to tell them is that they are being attacked and denounce the peacemakers for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same in any country."
— Hermann Goering (Nuremberg Trials)

 

“External threats” and “national interests” have almost always been used as two blades of a metaphorical pair of scissors to cut through any opposition to war and militarism. In his well-known Imperialism and Social Classes, the late economic historian Joseph Schumpeter described the hoary pretext of “threatened national interests” for war and militarism in the following words:

There was no corner of the known world where some interest was not alleged to be in danger or under actual attack. If the interests were not Roman, they were those of Rome’s allies; and if Rome had no allies, then allies would be invented. When it was utterly impossible to contrive such an interest—why, then it was the national honor that had been insulted. The fight was always invested with an aura of legality. Rome was always being attacked by evil-minded neighbors, always fighting for a breathing-space. The whole world was pervaded by a host of enemies, and it was manifestly Rome’s duty to guard against their indubitably aggressive designs.

In a similar fashion, the U.S. military-industrial complex has proven quite resourceful in frequently inventing new “external threats to our national interests,” or “the interests of our allies,” in order to stifle opposition to its militaristic plans that are often designed to justify its colossal apparatus and its lion’s share of national resources. During the Cold War years, the “threat of communism” served this purpose. Since then new substitutes for the threat of communism have been discovered in order to rationalize continued expansion of military spending. These have included “rogue states, global terrorism, axis of evil, militant Islam” and, more recently, “enemies of democracy.” Scrutiny of the claims of such threats to the national security or interests of the United States is the focus of this study.

Lees verder op : http://www.stateofnature.org/?p=5544#sthash.zeER66fl.dpuf

 

 

*www.wnd.com/2013/09/is-this-what-syria-war-really-about/

*www.wnd.com/2013/09/rush-syrians-gassed-with-help-from-u-s/

The Political Economy of U.S. Militarism (Palgrave/Macmillan 2007)

www.politicaleconomics.info/default.html

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bilderberg_Group

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trilateral_Commission

www.undovedmind.org/ISGP/AppendixA.htm

Een minder bekend voorbeeld van een 'false flag' operatie: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lavon_Affair